Tag: The Genealogical Adam and Eve

Jon Garvey: A Biblical Theology of People Outside the Garden

Jon Garvey published the first book-length response to Joshua Swamidass’ The Genealogical Adam and Eve, a theological case for people outside the garden.

Art & Ancestry: The Ancestral Shadow

David Rygiol responds with art: Most of our ancestors leave us no genes at all – they are genetic ghosts in our past, looming like a shadow.

Art & Ancestry: Repairing the Fracture

David Rygiol responds with art: “I grew up in a fractured world, and the fracture grew into me, challenging, unsettling my identity.”

Response to Madueme: Are People Outside the Garden Ruled Out?

Madeume’s objections do not challenge Swamidass’ key thesis: a traditional, literal reading of Scripture does not rule out people outside the Garden.

A Round of Written Interviews

A readers guide to the written interviews about the The Genealogical Adam and Eve: Christianity Today, Paul Louis Metzger, Sean McDowell, and Duke Divinity.

Implicated vs. Incidental: Relevance Theory and The Meaning of Genesis

John W. Hilber explains how Relevance Theory clarifies the meaning of text, by clarifying what is implicated vs. incidental to the message.

I Was Wrong on “Monophyletic”

I was wrong. I incorrectly used the terms “monophyletic” and “polyphyletic” in my book, The Genealogical Adam and Eve. I am correcting the record here.

Garvey Contemplates The Generations of Heavens and Earth

Responding to my book, Garvey argues that allowing for people outside the garden is helpful to theology, recovering the original understanding of Genesis.

Art Invites a Conversation on Ancestry

When it comes to human ancestry and origins, images can help communicate what words cannot, and invite a broader audience to join the conversation.

How will you manage mistakes in your book?

As for me, I aim to quickly correct my own mistakes as publicly as I make them. This is one of the demands of science, and what I expect of others.

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