Peaceful Science
Peaceful Science

What Does it Mean to be Human?

Making space for differences with a civic practice of science.

The Book

The Genealogical Adam and Eve

Some think Adam and Eve are a myth.

Some think evolution is a myth.


Either way, an honest account of science opens up space to engage larger questions together. 

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The Mailing List

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The Forum

To understand and to be understood...

Whatever your personal beliefs, we saved a chair for you. The forum is our front porch. Rowdy, informed, and playful. Come explore the grand questions with us. 

The Livestream Podcast 

The Blog

I went public in 2012 on evolution. When it comes to personal risks, very personal reasons take center stage. Why did I go public?

In 2012, with this article, I went public in The Journal, confessing that I had seen evidence for evolution, but found foundation in Christ.

In his book, “The War that Never Was,” Kenneth Kemp unpacks the historical misconception that science and faith are inherently at odds.

“Mere Science and the Christian Faith” by Greg Cootsona sparked a conversation about Intelligent Design’s place in science and in the Church.

A Mystery in the Weird Clouds of Venus

The recent discovery of phosphine on Venus was exciting and unexpected. What is the excitement really about and what could it mean for us?

Glenn Morton: Why I Left Young-Earth Creationism

In memory of Glenn Morton (1950-2020), Peaceful Science is republishing his personal account and testimony of leaving Young-Earth Creationism.

Matheson: A Humanist’s Invitation to Peaceful Science

Former Christian turned atheist, Stephen Matheson, invites fellow secular humanists to join the growing conversation at Peaceful Science.

Gavin Ortlund: Retrieving Augustine’s Doctrine of Creation

Gavin Ortlund’s new book, “Retrieving Augustine’s Doctrine of Creation,” explores how Augustine’s doctrine of creation influences current creation debates.

Art & Ancestry: Humans Rendered Apart

Whatever our skin color, country of origin, ethnicity, or culture, we are all one family, one blood, one race, the human race. What has rendered us apart?

The Biological Meaning of Race

We’ve understood differences to be rooted in our essential nature, but maybe they are not. So, maybe some of the ways the world is can be changed.